Welcome Policy User | Behavioral Health & Developmental Disabilities
Tutorials | | What's New

Viewing: Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS), 03-543

Current Status: Active PolicyStat ID: 425614

Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS), 03-543

    

POLICY

DBHDD administers Abnormal Involuntary Movements Scale (AIMS) tests to measure involuntary movements known as tardive dyskinesia (TD). TD is a disorder that sometimes develops as a side effect of long-term treatment with neuroleptic (antipsychotic) medications.

PROCEDURES

  1. An AIMS examination will be performed by a Physician, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN), or Physician Assistant (PA) on all new admissions and then at least semi-annually by the attending Physician or APRN, or Physician Assistant on all inpatients who are receiving antipsychotic medication. The examination should also be conducted at any time abnormal involuntary movements are suspected.
  2. See AIMS Form & Procedures (Attachment A).
    1. Either before or after completing the examination procedure, observe the patient unobtrusively at rest (e.g., in the waiting room).
    2. The chair to be used in this examination should be a hard, firm one without arms. Have the person remove their shoes and socks. Ask the patient whether there is anything in his or her mouth (such as gum or candy) and, if so, to remove it.
    3. Ask about the *current* condition of the patient's teeth. Ask if he or she wears dentures. Ask whether teeth or dentures bother the patient *now*.
    4. Ask whether the patient notices any movements in his or her mouth, face, hands, or feet. If yes, ask the patient to describe them and to indicate to what extent they *currently* bother the patient or interfere with activities.
    5. Have the patient sit in chair with hands on knees, legs slightly apart, and feet flat on floor. (Look at the entire body for movements while the patient is in this position.)
    6. Ask the patient to sit with hands hanging unsupported -- if male, between his legs, if female and wearing a dress, hanging over her knees. (Observe hands and other body areas).
    7. Ask the patient to open his or her mouth. (Observe the tongue at rest within the mouth.) Do this twice.
    8. Ask the patient to protrude his or her tongue. (Observe abnormalities of tongue movement.) Do this twice.
    9. Ask the patient to tap his or her thumb with each finger as rapidly as possible for 10 to 15 seconds, first with right hand, then with left hand. (Observe facial and leg movements.)
    10. Flex and extend the patient's left and right arms, one at a time.
    11. Ask the patient to stand up. (Observe the patient in profile. Observe all body areas again, hips included.)
    12. Ask the patient to extend both arms out in front, palms down. (Observe trunk, legs, and mouth.)
    13. Have the patient walk a few paces, turn, and walk back to the chair. (Observe hands and gait.) Do this twice.
Attachments:

Approval Signatures

Approver Date
Joetta Prost, Ph.D.: DBHDD Policy Director 4/16/2013
Emile Risby, M.D.: Medical Director 4/11/2013
Joetta Prost, Ph.D.: DBHDD Policy Director 4/11/2013
Older Version Approval Signatures
Approver Date
Joetta Prost, Ph.D.: DBHDD Policy Director 4/16/2013
Emile Risby, M.D.: Medical Director 4/11/2013
Joetta Prost, Ph.D.: DBHDD Policy Director 4/11/2013
Older Version Approval Signatures
Joetta Prost, Ph.D.: DBHDD Policy Director 8/16/2012
Emile Risby, M.D.: Medical Director 8/13/2012
Joetta Prost, Ph.D.: DBHDD Policy Director 8/2/2012